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Telluride 40th Film Festival Lineup

The Telluride Film Festival starts tomorrow and for the past few months the lineup was a complete mystery. Telluride has a tradition of keeping critics and attendees in the dark until the last moment and today they revealed their slate of this year's contenders.

Top mentions include: Cannes winner Abdellatif Kechiche‘s Blue Is The Warmest Color, Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity, Jason Reitman‘s Labor Day, Asghar Farhadi’s The Past, Ralph Fiennes‘ The Invisible Woman, Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin and documentaries from Errol Morris (The Unknown Known), Werner Herzog (Death Row: Blaine Milam and Robert Fratta). With the aforementioned list of films, I think it's safe to say that this is a solid group, most notable among the pictures being J.C. Chandor's All Is Lost, the Coens' Inside Llewyn Davis and Alexander Payne's Nebraska — all big coups for Telluride considering those three pictures will not be making it to Toronto International Film Fest this year.

Along with the screenings offered, special presentations include tributes to Robert Redford, Iranian director Mohammed Rasoulof and the music/movie collaborations of T Bone Burnett and the Coen brothers.

The 40th Telluride Film Festival is proud to present the following new feature films to play in its main program, the ‘SHOW’:
“All Is Lost,” J.C. Chandor
“Before the Winter Chill,” Philippe Claudel
“Bethlehem,” Uyval Adler
“Blue Is the Warmest Color,” Abdellatif Kechiche
“Burning Bush,” Agnieszka Holland
“Death Row: Blaine Milam and Robert Fratta,” Werner Herzog
“The Invisible Woman,” Ralph Fiennes
“Fifi Howls From Happiness,” Mitra Farahani
“The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden,” Dan Geller and Dayna Goldfine
“Gloria,” Sebastian Lelio
“Gravity,” Alfonso Cuaron (in 3D)
“Ida,” Pawel Pawlikowski
“Inside Llewyn Davis,” Joel and Ethan Coen
“La Maison de la Radio,” Nicolas Philibert
“Labor Day,” Jason Reitman
“The Lunchbox,” Ritesh Batra
“The Missing Picture,” Rithy Panh
“Nebraska,” Alexander Payne
“Palo Alto,” Gia Coppola
“The Past,” Asghar Farhadi
“Slow Food Story,” Stefano Sardo
“Starred Up,” David Mackenzie
   preceded by “Three Two,” Sarah-Violet Bliss
“Tim’s Vermeer,” Teller
“Tracks,” John Curran
“Under the Skin,” Jonathan Glazer
“The Unknown Known,” Errol Morris

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